Windows 10 Now Ready For Chinese Market - InformationWeek

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IoT
IoT
Software // Operating Systems
Commentary
12/18/2015
12:05 PM
Larry Loeb
Larry Loeb
Commentary
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Windows 10 Now Ready For Chinese Market

Microsoft and the government of China have come to a new agreement that will bring Windows 10 to the Chinese market. However, this version of Windows will conform to certain state demands.

Windows 10, New Devices, Exec Shakeup: Microsoft's 2015
Windows 10, New Devices, Exec Shakeup: Microsoft's 2015
(Click image for larger view and slideshow.)

Microsoft announced Dec. 17 that it has finally reached a deal with the Chinese government to provide Windows 10 to users in that country.

In a blog post Thursday, Yusuf Mehdi, corporate vice president for Microsoft's Windows and Devices Group, wrote: "We're announcing a new joint venture that will license, deploy, manage and optimize Windows 10 for China's government agencies and certain state owned enterprises and provide ongoing support and services for these customers."

Microsoft will partner with China Electronics Technology Group (CETC) to create C&M Information Technologies, though the name of the joint venture may change. The joint venture will control the licensing of Windows 10 to government agencies and to some major state-owned corporations such as those that control energy, telecommunications, and transportation.

C&M will additionally provide backend services, including product activation, patch management, and support for Windows 10.

This is the finalization of agreements made in September as Microsoft strove to achieve Chinese adoption of Windows 10. China is a major market for almost all Western technology companies. Additional sales there could produce millions in additional revenue for Redmond's bottom line.

"Microsoft and CETC have been working on a custom image of Windows 10 for government customers since we announced our initial agreement in September, based on the tools that we make available to organizations around the world," according to the blog post.

(Image: Pete_Flyer/iStockphoto)

(Image: Pete_Flyer/iStockphoto)

Those September agreements include a cloud computing agreement where Microsoft, Unisplendour Corporation (UNIS), and 21Vianet will provide hybrid cloud solutions and services to Chinese customers, especially state-owned enterprise customers. It also said then it would make Baidu.com the default search and homepage in the Microsoft Edge browser in China.

So much for a Chinese Bing.

Microsoft has had setbacks in China in past years.

In 2014, the Central Government Procurement Center banned Windows 8 from agency PCs. Antitrust regulators also raided Microsoft offices around that time.

CETC has more than 180 commercial subsidiaries, most of them involved in defense-related research and development and the production of defense and dual-use electronics. It also supplies the People's Liberation Army (PLA), as well as government agencies and state-run companies with technology products.

[Read how Windows 10 could drive more PC sales in the next year.]

All of this activity points to Microsoft letting China run a specific, tailored version of Windows 10 that is not the same one found in the rest of the world.

Microsoft even admitted this, although obliquely. It said in the announcement: "[C&M] will collect feedback from these government customers on their specific use requirements to inform the creation of the successive updates of the government Windows 10 image, which may be developed by the joint organization … [while] recognizing that public sector solutions may differ from technology offered to private sector enterprises and consumers around the world."

One can only wonder what these Windows 10 images and their successive updates will contain.

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Larry Loeb has written for many of the last century's major "dead tree" computer magazines, having been, among other things, a consulting editor for BYTE magazine and senior editor for the launch of WebWeek. He has written a book on the Secure Electronic Transaction Internet ... View Full Bio
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larryloeb
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larryloeb,
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1/4/2016 | 11:01:30 PM
Re: Wait and See
I don't see it as market research. More like doing a Facebook with the OS rather than an app.
nomii
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nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
1/4/2016 | 9:33:13 PM
Re: Wait and See

Larry as far as pirated windows is concerned you are correct that MSFT is facing large financial lose. i think collecting data about its users might be a survey for some new developments for new OS which will reduce it to some extant. i believe that its a right move but might not go good for many. what is your opinion?

nomii
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nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
1/4/2016 | 9:26:22 PM
Re: Wait and See
Larry you highlighted a fair point. as far as using information is concerned it might not go good with some. As concerned to previous software MSFT needs to maintain a balance not innovating too much otherwise they might loose the hard earned place. so they need to take very calculated steps.
larryloeb
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larryloeb,
User Rank: Author
12/23/2015 | 1:51:11 PM
Re: Wait and See
Interesting question,but one I have no idea about.
progman2000
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progman2000,
User Rank: Ninja
12/23/2015 | 1:44:45 PM
Re: Wait and See
That's a pretty interesting supposition, it wouldn't surprise me if such a back door existed, and to be honest I am probably in the minority that wouldn't care if it meant we were able to use it to snag at least one homegrown terrorist nutjob.

Speaking of that, I wonder what the OS of choice is for the wannabe Jihadist? I wonder if that is a consideration in all their propaganda gibberish?
larryloeb
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larryloeb,
User Rank: Author
12/23/2015 | 1:28:16 PM
Re: Wait and See
I'll tel the MPAA that.

And Kim Dotcom.

[g]
PedroGonzales
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PedroGonzales,
User Rank: Ninja
12/23/2015 | 1:26:02 PM
Re: Wait and See
Yes; most of Windows computer are pirated, if they are able to secure partnerships with the government, the Chinese government may work in enforcing their copyright laws among their citizens.  Any government with no enforcement on copyright is a nightware for any company.
larryloeb
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larryloeb,
User Rank: Author
12/21/2015 | 8:31:26 AM
Re: Wait and See
Oh yes, Asian markets will be huge if they can get penetration.

But remember, previous Windows were mostly pirated. Win10 is "free", but takes user information as its price.

Will these markets allow MSFT access to this kind of information as the "price" for it? We shall see.
larryloeb
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larryloeb,
User Rank: Author
12/21/2015 | 8:28:53 AM
Re: Wait and See
Legacy software will keep Win10 relevant, despite the other factors. They will need it to use past and future tasks.
nomii
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nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
12/20/2015 | 10:10:16 PM
Re: Wait and See

@Li Tan agreed with your point of view. I feel that the bigger markets like china and india are very lucrative if any industry can get a hand to invest in them. If they can market their product to its liking then there is no turning back. I feel that microsoft needs to play its cards very cautiously. And do not let go this big opportunity. What your say?

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